Two years of Trump: Dizzying dysfunction, controversies, ma…


Trump two years

Carolyn Kaster / AP File (2017)

President Donald Trump gives the thumbs-up as he finishes speaking in April 2017 at the Pennsylvania Farm Show Complex and Expo Center in Harrisburg, Pa. Today marks the second anniversary of Trump’s inauguration, and the nation is divided on whether to give the president a thumbs-up or a thumbs-down on his first two years in office.

On Jan. 20, 2017, Donald Trump took the oath of office as the 45th president of the United States.

The two years since have generated a ceaseless swirl of news about chaos and dysfunction in the West Wing, divisive comments and tweets from Trump, a simmering investigation into the Trump team’s involvement with Russian nationalists, and many other topics.

The stories came so fast it could be difficult to keep up with them. In the short time since Trump was sworn in, four of his former associates have been convicted of felonies and 10 of his original Cabinet secretaries have left, including four who faced investigations into major conflicts of interest and other improprieties.

Then there were controversies that didn’t involve Russia or comings and goings from the White House — Trump’s Charlottesville comments, family separations at the border and the administration’s response to Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico, to name just a few.

So today, the Sun is devoting our entire publication to this week-by-week annal of some of the most noteworthy moments from Trump’s first two years in office. We think it’s important to present this record, as the constant churn of storylines coming out of this White House can cause memories of important events to blur.

It’s been two dizzying years. We hope the following timeline provides readers with a road map of how we got to this point.

Inauguration through Week 1 (Jan. 20-28)

During an inauguration speech in which he presents a remarkably bleak view of the nation, Trump says “this American carnage stops right here and stops right now.”

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Early on his first full day in office, Trump calls White House chief of staff Reince Priebus and screams at him to debunk media reports that the crowd at his inauguration had been smaller than former President Barack Obama’s. A short time later comes …

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… The “Baghdad Bob” press conference. In his first statement from the White House briefing room, press secretary Sean Spicer berates the media for “deliberately false reporting” and says Trump drew “the largest audience to witness an inauguration, period.” Two weeks later …

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… Melissa McCarthy turns Spicer into a national punchline, portraying him as a gum-chomping rage-aholic in the opening of “Saturday Night Live.” It’s reportedly the beginning of the end for Spicer, as White House sources say Trump believes that being mocked by a woman makes Spicer look weak.

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Trump visits CIA headquarters with a goal of showing the agency he fully supports it but draws criticism for presenting a speech focusing mainly on himself. “And then they say, ‘Is Donald Trump an intellectual?’ ” Trump says. “Trust me, I’m like a smart person.”

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Presaging the midterm election results in 2018, millions of women gather in cities across the nation, including Las Vegas, to march in protest of Trump. At the Las Vegas march, organizers used the occasion to launch a voter mobilization effort.

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Trump counselor Kellyanne Conway says Spicer presented “alternative facts” with his claim about the inauguration crowd. A buzz term for the administration is born.

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Trump signs an order withdrawing the U.S. from the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal.

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Trump signs orders to build the border wall and cut off federal funding for cities shielding immigrants.

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In the first order he signs, Trump clearly has not prepared. Surrounded by lawmakers, he examines the document, asks what it addresses, asks where to sign it and says he thought it was for health care.

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Trump tweets that he will seek an investigation into voter fraud, doubling down on his unfounded claim that “millions and millions” of fraudulent votes were cast against him.

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Without warning, Trump bans visitors from seven Muslim-majority countries from entering the U.S. for 90 days, and bans refugees from entry for 120 days. The order unleashes chaos, as there are no instructions on how to enforce it.

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Trump fires acting Attorney General Sally Yates after she defies the White House by saying the Justice Department will not defend the travel ban.

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The stock market closes Jan. 25 with the Dow Jones industrial average over 20,000 for the first time.

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As he takes office, Trump refuses to create a clear firewall between his global business empire and the Oval Office. Handing control, but not ownership, of the business to his two sons Eric and Donald Jr. in January, President Trump, who will later spend many of his weekends at Trump properties in what amounts to an ongoing advertisement, ignores the warnings of ethics watchdogs in both parties who say this situation poses serious problems. The decision establishes the tone at the outset for the muddied ethical landscape of Trumpland.

Week 2 (Jan. 29-Feb. 4)

Trump nominates Neil Gorsuch to the Supreme Court.

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A federal judge blocks the travel ban. The administration files an emergency motion to stop the order from taking effect.

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Gallup releases polling results showing Trump’s approval rating at 42 percent, the lowest of any president two weeks into his administration. Trump’s disapproval rating is 53 percent.

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Speaking of alternative facts: Defending the travel ban in an interview, Conway cites two Iraqis who committed what she describes as a massacre in Bowling Green, Ky. Such an incident never happened.

Week 3 (Feb. 5-11)

A three-judge panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals unanimously refuses to reinstate the travel ban.

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Time magazine publishes a cover profile of White House aide Steve Bannon, questioning to what extent he influences Trump. Trump bristles over the suggestion that Bannon is his puppet master, tweeting: “I call my own shots.”

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Trump tells Fox News’ Bill O’Reilly that he respects Russian President Vladimir Putin, prompting O’Reilly to ask how the president could respect a murderer. “You got a lot of killers,” Trump says. “You think our country is so innocent?”

Week 4 (Feb. 12-18)

National security adviser Mike Flynn resigns after disclosures that Flynn misled Vice President Mike Pence and other officials about his communications with Russia’s ambassador to the U.S.

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Trump dials up his attack on the media in a tweet: “The FAKE NEWS media (failing @nytimes, @NBCNews, @ABC, @CBS, @CNN) is not my enemy, it is the enemy of the American People!”

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Trump bashes Pope Francis after the pontiff criticizes him over his immigration policies. “A person who thinks only about building walls … and not building bridges, is not Christian,” the pontiff says. Trump says Francis is being used as a pawn by the Mexican government and that it’s “disgraceful” for the pope to question his faith.

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Trump’s first solo press conference is a 77-minute spectacle in which he wildly exaggerates his accomplishments, makes blatantly false claims about the size of his Electoral College victory — calling it the biggest since Ronald Reagan despite the fact George H.W. Bush, Bill Clinton and Obama all won more electoral votes — and berates the media. One of the oddest moments comes when a black reporter asks Trump if he has consulted with the Congressional Black Caucus about his plan for inner cities, and he tells her that she should organize the meeting.

Week 5 (Feb. 19-25)

Trump picks Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster as his new national security adviser.

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Trump revokes Obama administration guidelines on transgender bathrooms.

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After yelling “Get out of my country” to a group of men that includes an immigrant from India at bar in suburban Kansas City, a man returns to the establishment and opens fire. He kills the immigrant, Srinivas Kuchibhotla, and wounds two other men. The slaying heightens concerns that immigrants are facing increasing harassment in the aftermath of Trump’s election.

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Univision publishes a story documenting more than 40 reports of readers being subjected to racist insults and hateful speech since mid-January.

Week 6 (Feb. 26-March 4)

Explaining why Republicans have been slow to embrace a replacement plan for Obamacare, Trump says “nobody knew that health care could be so complicated.”

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Trump draws wide praise for his address to a joint session of Congress, which is far more optimistic than his inaugural address. However …

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… The afterglow is quickly snuffed out when The Washington Post reports that Attorney General Jeff Sessions had two conversations in 2016 with Russia’s ambassador to the U.S., neither of which he revealed during his confirmation hearing when asked about possible contacts between Trump’s campaign and Russia.

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The day after the Post’s story appears, Sessions announces he will recuse himself from investigations related to the 2016 presidential campaign, including any Russian interference.

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Trump issues a series of tweets accusing President Obama of wiretapping Trump Tower during the election. Trump offers no evidence, and none has surfaced since. The situation is symptomatic of a president willing to launch unwarranted accusations against those who oppose him.

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After a report by The New York Times, the White House confirms that Flynn, Jared Kushner and Russian Ambassador Sergey Kislyak had a previously undisclosed meeting in December at Trump Tower to establish a line of communication between Trump’s transition team and the Russian government.

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ProPublica reports the following: “Since Jan. 1, at least 105 locations of Jewish organizations in the United States — including schools, Jewish Community Centers and offices of the Anti-Defamation League — have received a total of 146 bomb threats.”

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Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos is criticized after referring to the nation’s historically black colleges as “pioneers” of the school choice movement. Critics point out that most of the colleges were established during the Jim Crow era to provide education to blacks who were barred from attending colleges catering to whites.

Week 7 (March 5-11)

Trump issues a revised version of the Muslim travel ban, which he claims is critical to maintaining national security and has nothing to do with religion.

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The economy adds 235,000 jobs, and unemployment dips to 4.7 percent.

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Homeland Security Director John Kelly acknowledges that the administration is considering separating families at the border as a deterrent method. The story doesn’t draw much attention at the time, but the fuse is lit on what will become a bombshell of an issue.

Week 8 (March 12-18)

Duck! The Trump administration formally specifies that the border wall should be 30 feet tall. Later, in listing reasons a wall of that height is needed, Trump says it will prevent people from being hit in the head by 60-pound bags of drugs being thrown over the current wall.

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Hours before the revised travel ban is scheduled to go into effect, a federal judge in Hawaii blocks it. Trump reacts angrily, accusing the judge of “unprecedented judicial overreach.”

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FBI Director James Comey confirms that agents have been investigating possible collusion between Trump’s campaign and Russia since July. In response to questions before the House Intelligence Committee, Comey also says he’s seen no evidence that Obama ordered wiretapping of Trump Tower.

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During a stop in South Korea on a regional tour, Secretary of State Rex Tillerson says the policy of “strategic patience” toward North Korea has ended and that further aggression by the Kim regime could provoke a military response from the U.S.

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Week 9 (March 19-25)

Former British Prime Minister David Cameron jokes that one of the greatest benefits of being out of office is that he no longer has to listen to Trump’s wiretapped conversations. Cameron is among many people who are mocking Trump as it becomes increasingly clear that his wiretapping allegations are entirely baseless.

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The Associated Press issues a report showing that former Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort had done lobbying work for a Russian billionaire to benefit Russian President Vladimir Putin. The report contradicts statements by Manafort and Trump that the campaign manager had never worked to aid the Russian government.

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CNN reports that the FBI has evidence suggesting Trump associates “may have coordinated” with Russians to influence the outcome of the 2016 election by releasing damaging information about Hillary Clinton.

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Despite Trump threatening GOP lawmakers that “you will lose your seats” if they don’t pass the party’s Obamacare replacement bill, a vote on the measure is postponed due to a split between GOP conservatives and moderates.

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Devin Nunes, the chair of the House committee investigating possible Russian meddling in the election, makes his “midnight run” when he disappears in an Uber car and makes an unscheduled late-night trip to the White House. There, he’s reportedly provided with information from intelligence agencies that captured communications of Trump and his associates while conducting surveillance on foreign targets. Then, in a remarkable breach of protocol, Nunes has an impromptu news conference in which he states that Trump had been caught up in an investigation by U.S. intelligence. He then briefs Trump on his findings. The situation raises serious questions about Nunes’ ability to lead an independent investigation.

Week 10 (March 26-April 1)

The Wall Street Journal reports that Flynn has told the FBI and congressional officials he is willing to be interviewed in exchange for immunity from prosecution.

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The White House releases documents showing that Flynn failed to reveal income from a Russian television network and a firm linked to Russia in a financial disclosure form he signed and submitted in February.

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Trump issues an executive order that aims to dismantle a number of Obama-era environmental regulations, including a moratorium on coal leases on federal lands. Most significantly, it marks the beginning of the process to rescind the EPA’s Clean Power Plan.

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The first quarter of 2017 closes with GDP growth of 1.8 percent.

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During a signing ceremony, Trump leaves the Oval Office as he’s peppered with questions about a tweet defending the now indicted Flynn. But Trump has neglected to sign the order, prompting Vice President Mike Pence to sheepishly retrieve the document from the president’s desk.

Week 11 (April 2-8)

On April 4, North Korea tests a missile that reaches the Sea of Japan. The test comes amid growing tensions between the North and the U.S., including recent comments by Trump that “If China is not going to solve North Korea, we will.”

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Trump orders cruise missile strikes on a Syrian airbase in response to a reported chemical attack.

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Bannon is removed from the National Security Council’s Principals Committee, a sign that he has lost a power struggle against a faction led by Kushner and lost favor with Trump after grabbing too much of the media spotlight.

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Kelly shifts on the reason behind family separations at the border, saying it will only be done “if the child’s life is in danger.”

Week 12 (April 9-15)

Targeting Islamic State militants, the U.S. drops the largest non-nuclear bomb in its arsenal in Afghanistan.

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It’s revealed that the administration is no longer releasing the identities of visitors to the White House. Government watchdogs are alarmed, saying public disclosure of the visitor lists is critical in determining who may be trying to influence policy in the West Wing.

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Trump tells Fox Business that he made the decision on the missile launch over “the most beautiful piece of chocolate cake” and incorrectly identifies Iraq as the target.

Week 13 (April 16-22)

Thousands of protesters march in more than 150 cities nationwide demanding that Trump turn over his tax returns.

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Gorsuch is approved by the Senate and sworn in.

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During a regular press briefing, Spicer compares Syria’s Bashar Assad to Adolf Hitler, saying, “You had someone as despicable as Hitler who didn’t even sink to using chemical weapons.” The comment triggers an avalanche of criticism, with critics noting that Hitler gassed more than 6 million Jews during the Holocaust. Spicer issues an apology.

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Federal Election Commission filings show that Trump brought in a record $107 million for his inauguration, more than doubling the previous record set by Obama in 2009. Seven-figure donations came from such 1 percenters as Charles Schwab and Sheldon Adelson, who donated $5 million.

Week 14 (April 23-29)

Can’t argue that: The AP publishes a story from an interview with Trump, headlined, “Trump at 100 days: ‘It’s a different kind of presidency.’ ”

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Congressional Republicans introduce a revised version of the American Health Care Act, their Obamacare replacement measure.

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North Korea conducts an unsuccessful ballistic missile test, defying a warning by Trump that a “major, major conflict” between the U.S. and North Korea is possible.

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Trump offers a White House invitation to Rodrigo Duterte, the Philippines president accused of of abetting death squads and extrajudicial killings. The invitation raises concerns about Trump’s affinity for strongman leaders and questions about his support of American values.

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In an exclusive interview with Reuters, Trump says he’s surprised how difficult it is being president. “This is more work than in my previous life. I thought it would be easier,” he says.

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The Washington Post reports that Environmental Protection Agency director Scott Pruitt has requested around-the-clock security, a first for an EPA leader.

Week 15 (April 30-May 6)

American history, Trump-style: Trump suggests he doesn’t understand why the Civil War happened and says Andrew Jackson was upset about the conflict. Jackson died 16 years before the Civil War began.

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Trump signs an executive order easing enforcement of rules barring churches and other religious groups from political activities.

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The House narrowly passes the Obamacare repeal-and- replace bill, including a provision allowing states to opt out of providing coverage for individuals with pre-existing conditions. Trump tweets: “Republican Senators will not let the American people down! ObamaCare premiums and deductibles are way up – it was a lie and it is dead!”

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Week 16 (May 7-13)

Trump fires Comey. The White House cites the cause as dissatisfaction with how Comey handled the Hillary Clinton email probe.

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In an interview with NBC’s Lester Holt, Trump directly contradicts the White House’s official explanation of Comey’s firing by saying that he made the decision himself based on the Russia investigation. “I was going to fire Comey, knowing there was no good time to do it. And in fact when I decided to just do it, I said to myself, I said you know, this Russia thing with Trump and Russia is a made up story, it’s an excuse by the Democrats for having lost an election that they should have won,” Trump tells Holt.

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The New York Times reports that Trump asked Comey to pledge loyalty to him during a January dinner.

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The Washington Post reports that Trump disclosed highly classified information to Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov and Russian Ambassador Sergey Kislyak during a meeting in the Oval Office. The White House initially denies the story, but Trump acknowledges it happened and claims he has the “absolute right” to share intelligence with Russia.

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Trump creates the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity, a group that will investigate his claims of widespread voter fraud. Critics say the commission is a front for establishing suppressive voting laws nationwide.

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North Korea conducts yet another ballistic missile test, and this one is successful. The two-stage, mobile rocket flies 430 miles before crashing into the sea.

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Referring to his tax plan during an interview with The Economist, Trump makes the false claim that he invented the term “priming the pump.”

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Turning back the clock: Trump fumes to Time magazine about the Navy’s new electronicmagnetic system for launching planes off of carriers, saying it should be “going to (expletive) steam” instead.

Week 17 (May 14-20)

Obstruction of justice? The New York Times obtains a memo written by Comey in February saying Trump asked him to shut down the FBI’s investigation into Michael Flynn a day after Flynn was ousted from the White House. In the memo, Comey says Trump told him, “I hope you can let this go.” Trump denies it.

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Enter Mueller: Rosenstein appoints former FBI Director Robert Mueller as special counsel to oversee the Russia investigation. Priebus will claim later that moments before Mueller’s appointment, Sessions had offered to resign after Trump subjected him to a tirade in which Trump blamed Sessions’ recusal from the Russia investigation for the scandal.

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Citing a document containing details of a White House meeting between Trump and Russian officials, The New York Times reports that Trump told the Russians that firing Comey relieved him of “great pressure” from the investigation.

“I just fired the head of the FBI. He was crazy, a real nut job,” Trump is reported to have said. “I faced great pressure because of Russia. That’s taken off.”

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The Washington Post reports that during the Trump Tower meeting involving Kushner, Flynn and Kislyak, Kushner suggested establishing a secret and secure communication channel between the Trump campaign and the Russian government.

Week 18 (May 21-27)

Late-night comics and internet commenters light up as Trump issues a baffling tweet: “Despite the negative press covfefe.” There’s no statement before or after the message that would help explain it.

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The AHCA will cause 23 million Americans to lose insurance by 2026, says a new analysis by the Congressional Budget Office and staff of the Joint Committee on Taxation.

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The Washington Post reports that Kushner is under investigation by the FBI over the Trump tower meeting. Reuters reports that Kushner had at least three previously undisclosed contacts with Kislyak during and after the presidential campaign.

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Trump makes his first trip overseas as president, a five-country tour in which he visits Saudi Arabia, Israel and the Vatican. Pope Francis urges him to be a peacemaker.

Week 19 (May 28-June 3)

Trump announces that the U.S. will pull out of the Paris climate agreement.

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Don’t get mad, get even: A Mexican businessman takes out his frustrations over Trump’s insults to his countrymen by introducing Trump toilet paper. The product’s marketing slogan: “Softness without borders.”

Week 20 (June 4-10)

Eight people are killed and 48 wounded when three men run over pedestrians on a London Bridge walkway, then get out and attack others with knives. Trump reacts by issuing a tweet bolstering his travel ban, prompting criticism that he instead should have expressed sympathy for the victims and support for the British people.

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In televised testimony to the Senate Intelligence Committee, Comey says he kept notes after talking privately with Trump because “I was honestly concerned that he might lie about the nature of our meeting.” He further says he gave his memo to a friend to leak to the media after seeing Trump’s tweet saying Comey “better hope there are no ‘tapes’ of our conversations.”

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After his first face-to-face conversation with Trump, Russian President Vladimir Putin hails the meeting and says he believes Trump accepted his assurances that Russia didn’t meddle in the U.S. presidential election.

Week 21 (June 11-17)

The Washington Post reports that Mueller is investigating Kushner’s finances and business dealings.

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The San Francisco-based 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals becomes the second appellate court to reject the Trump administration’s attempt to overturn a federal judge’s decision blocking the travel ban.

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The Washington Post reports that Mueller is investigating Trump for obstruction of justice.

Week 22 (June 18-24)

Yahoo News reports that Trump’s lawyers have learned that Donald Trump Jr. has sent and received emails regarding a June 2016 meeting involving Trump Jr., Manafort, Kushner and a Russian lawyer connected to the Kremlin.

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In an interview with The New York Times, Trump issues a warning to Mueller not to investigate the Trump family’s financial history.

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Trump draws ridicule when, during a meeting with Panamanian President Juan Carlos Varela, he brags that the Panama Canal is “doing quite well.” “I think we did a good job of building it, right — a very good job,” he says. Varela interjects, “Yeah, about 100 years ago.”

Week 23 (June 25-July 1)

The Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity sends letters to all 50 secretaries of state requesting such information as voter names, addresses, dates of birth, voting histories and the the last four digits of Social Security numbers for all voters. Several states refuse to comply fully, including Nevada.

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Kushner hires a defense attorney.

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The Supreme Court agrees to review the legality of Trump’s travel ban.

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Senate Republican leaders delay a vote on their Obamacare repeal-and-replace bill, the Better Care Reconciliation Act, after it becomes clear the measure doesn’t have enough votes for passage. Nevada Sen. Dean Heller is among the Republicans who express concerns about the bill.

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During the airing of MSNBC’s “Morning Joe,” Trump issues tweets criticizing hosts Joe Scarborough and Mika Brzezinski. The rant, which includes a claim that Brzezinski had been “bleeding badly from a face-lift” during a visit to Mar-a-Lago, prompts criticism that Trump should be spending his energy on more important issues. “Mr. President, your tweet was beneath the office and represents what is wrong with American politics, not the greatness of America,” Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham tweets.

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Mueller dials up the heat: Federal investigators raid Manafort’s home, reportedly armed with a search warrant to obtain materials from the residence.

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The second quarter of 2017 closes with GDP growth of 3 percent.

Week 24 (July 2-8)

Trump tweets a video in which he tackles and punches a man whose face has been replaced by a CNN logo.

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North Korea successfully tests its first intercontinental ballistic missile. Trump issues a derisive tweet referencing President Kim Jong Un: “North Korea has just launched another missile. Does this guy have anything better to do with his life?”

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In a face-to-face meeting with Putin at the G20 summit, Trump tells Putin it is an “honor” to meet him and that he anticipates “positive things” happening between the U.S. and Russia. Later, it’s revealed that Trump and Putin met a second time for nearly an hour, with only Putin’s interpreter present and no record of the conversation made.

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Donald Jr. comes under scrutiny: Citing interviews and documents, The New York Times breaks the news that Donald Trump Jr. arranged a June 2016 meeting at Trump Tower with members of the Trump team and a Russian lawyer with connections to the Kremlin.

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Trump Jr. issues a statement saying the purpose of the meeting was to discuss a program for adoption of Russian children. The statement says the meeting was not related to the campaign and there was no follow-up. The source of the statement will soon become significant.

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The next day, the Times reports that Trump Jr. was promised damaging information about Hillary Clinton before the Trump Tower meeting.

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Based on the new report, Trump Jr. issues a new statement containing a different explanation of the meeting. He acknowledges he was offered information that could be helpful to the campaign, but says none was offered — further, he says the source claimed to know Russia-connected individuals who financially supported Clinton and the Democrats. Trump Jr. says there was no further contact and that his father knew nothing about the meeting.

Week 25 (July 9-15)

Citing sources who say they’ve seen emails involving the meeting, the Times reports that Trump Jr. went into it knowing that it involved a Russian lawyer offering compromising information about Clinton as part of a Russian government effort in support of his father’s campaign.

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Later, after learning that the Times has obtained copies of the emails, Trump tweets images of his email chain related to the meeting. He issues a statement saying he thought the information being offered was standard political opposition research.

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Minutes after the tweets, the Times reports that the emails reveal that Trump Jr. agreed to the meeting after being promised documents that “would incriminate Hillary and her dealings with Russia and would be very useful to your father.” Further, Trump Jr. was told that the documents were “part of Russia and its government’s support for Mr. Trump,” the newspaper reports.

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The emails include messages from publicist Rob Goldstone, who helped arrange the meeting. Among the excerpts: “The Crown prosecutor of Russia … offered to provide the Trump campaign with some official documents and information that would incriminate Hillary and her dealings with Russia and would be very useful to your father. This is obviously very high level and sensitive information but is part of Russia and its government’s support for Mr. Trump.”

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The circle widens: Various media reports reveal that the meeting included at least eight people, including Trump Jr., Kushner, Manafort, Russian lawyer Natalia Veselnitskaya and Russian-American lobbyist Rinat Akhmetshin, who is reputed to have ties to Russian intelligence.

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An ABC News/Washington Post poll puts Trump’s approval rating at 36 percent, the lowest of any president in 70 years at this point in his administration.

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The Center for Public Integrity says an outside public relations agent has been working for free to provide a “shadow press office” for Bannon. That’s a possible violation of a federal law barring government employees from accepting voluntary services.

Week 26 (July 16-22)

Another attempt at repealing and replacing Obamacare falls apart in the Senate.

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In an interview with The New York Times, Trump says he wouldn’t have appointed Sessions if he had known Sessions would recuse himself from the Russia investigation.

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Amid mounting pressure from the Mueller investigation, the failure to spur the Senate into action on Obamacare and the ongoing internal power struggle, turmoil tears at Trump’s team. A triggering event is Trump’s out-of-nowhere hiring of Anthony Scaramucci as communications director, a move that Priebus sharply opposes. Spicer resigns. Ousters will soon follow.

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In an 11-page statement to the Senate Intelligence Committee, Kushner denies colluding with Russia and portrays his meetings with Russian operatives as innocent interactions.

Week 27 (July 23-29)

Scaramucci begins the week by pledging to Fox News that he’ll launch “an era of a new good feeling” and says he hopes to “create a more positive mojo.” Four days later …

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… What was that about “good feeling?” In a call to a reporter with The New Yorker, Scaramucci calls Priebus “a (expletive) paranoid schizophrenic” who would be asked to resign, and also uses coarse language to criticize Bannon. Scaramucci later is quoted threatening to fire the entire communications team and vowing to “(expletive) kill all the leakers.”

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The Senate once again fails to repeal and replace Obamacare, this time on a dramatic thumbs-down vote from John McCain.

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The vote has major repercussions for Priebus, whom Trump reportedly blames for not being able to help deliver votes. Priebus will later say that Trump begins belittling him, referring to him as “Reincey” and at one point calling him in to swat a fly.

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Priebus exits the administration, apparently by tweet and left shocked on the tarmac near Air Force One. He had expected to be allowed to stay on for a couple of weeks out of his loyalty to Trump, but instead Trump promotes Kelly from director of Homeland Security to chief of staff.

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Kelly sets about trying to establish order by restricting Oval Office access, blocking some calls to the White House switchboard and establishing broad authority over staffing.

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Trump is criticized by law enforcement authorities and others for encouraging police brutality after he tells a group of officers to not “be too nice” with people in their custody, such as when they’re loading handcuffed suspects into police vehicles.

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In a series of tweets, Trump announces that transgender people will no longer be allowed to serve in the military. The tweet surprises Defense Secretary James Mattis, who disagrees with the ban and will push back by slow-playing implementation of it.

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Hell of a speech: Trump presents a campaign-style speech at the Boy Scout National Jamboree, where he attacks his opponents, brags about his accomplishments and uses a mild profanity. Afterward, the chief Scout executive for the Boy Scouts of America issues an apology for the remarks.

Week 28 (July 30-Aug. 5)

End of an “era”: Scaramucci becomes a short-timer even by the Trump administration’s standards. Amid a torrent of derision over his tirade in The New Yorker story, he is fired after 10 days on the job.

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Nothing to see here, folks: On the same day of Scaramucci’s departure, Trump tweets there is “No WH chaos!”

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Mueller impanels a grand jury and requests documents from the White House related to Flynn.

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The Washington Post reports that Trump dictated the initial misleading statement from Trump Jr. about the June 2016 meeting, overriding a plan by staff to respond with a truthful account of the situation.

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New White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders says Trump “weighed in” on the original statement as “any father would.”

Week 29 (Aug. 6-12)

After violence breaks out in Charlottesville, Va., Trump ignites a firestorm when he issues a statement condemning the hatred “on many sides” but not singling out white supremacists.

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Trump tells reporters that North Korea will be met with “fire and fury like the world has never seen” if it continues to threaten the U.S. He follows up by saying the U.S. military is “locked and loaded.”

Week 30 (Aug. 13-19)

A furious reaction to his Charlottesville comment prompts Trump to issue an on-camera statement walking it back. “Racism is evil,” he reads. “And those who cause violence in its name are criminals and thugs, including the KKK, neo-Nazis, white supremacists and other hate groups that are repugnant to everything we hold dear as Americans.”

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The walk-back is short-lived. The next day, Trump doubles down when, during a combative exchange with reporters during what was supposed to be a news conference on infrastructure, he says there were “very fine people” on both sides. He further defends the white supremacists by claiming incorrectly that they had a permit to demonstrate while counterprotesters did not.

•••

Trump’s comments draw applause from the extremist right.

“Thank you President Trump for your honesty & courage to tell the truth about #Charlottesville & condemn the leftist terrorists in BLM/Antifa,” tweets former KKK Grand Wizard David Duke. The editor of Daily Stormer, a white supremacist and neo-Nazi site, praises Trump for refusing “to even mention anything to do with us.”

•••

Republican Party figures and business leaders harshly rebuke Trump over Charlottesville, and members of his two major business advisory councils resign. Trump responds by lashing out and continuing to dial up his rhetoric. “Sad to see the history and culture of our great country being ripped apart with the removal of our beautiful statues and monuments,” he tweets about monuments to the Confederacy.

•••

Bannon contacts a progressive publication and gives a candid interview in which he contradicts Trump’s stated policy on North Korea and describes his efforts to push out adversaries in the administration. Days later, Bannon is ousted as part of Kelly’s effort to rein in chaos in the West Wing.

Week 31 (Aug. 20-26)

At a campaign rally in Phoenix, Trump blames the media for the furor over his Charlottesville comments and defends his statements. “The words were perfect,” he says.

•••

During the same rally, Trump also hints that he’ll pardon controversial former Sheriff Joe Arpaio, who was convicted of violating federal rulings against racial profiling. Days later, Trumpissues the pardon.

•••

Sebastian Gorka, a former Breitbart News editor who serves as a deputy assistant to the president, follows Bannon out the door. He laments in his resignation letter that “the individuals who most embodied and represented the policies that will ‘Make America Great Again’ have been internally countered, systematically removed or undermined in recent months.”

•••

As a man obsessed with claiming (rightly or wrongly) historic achievements, and having come into office with the lowest approval rating of any president in the era of modern polling, Trump continues to set records with a 34 percent approval rating in the Gallup Poll.

Week 32 (Aug. 27-Sept. 2)

A spokesman for Putin confirms that Michael Cohen, Trump’s personal lawyer and business adviser, sent him a message in January 2016 seeking help in reviving a stalled Trump Tower development in Moscow.

•••

Hurricane Harvey inundates Houston. Trump is criticized for egotism and a lack of empathy when he arrives to survey the damage and announces, “What a crowd! What a turnout!”

•••

Mueller issues subpoenas to Manafort, Manafort’s spokesman and an attorney for a law firm that has represented Manafort. In related news, Trump Jr. agrees to testify privately to the Senate Judiciary Committee.

Week 33 (Sept. 3-9)

Now, there’s a wedding cake: Putin says Trump is “not my bride, and I’m not his groom.”

•••

Through Sessions, Trump announces he’s rescinding Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals protections effective in six months, giving Congress a deadline for finding a resolution for the nation’s 800,000 Dreamers. The move draws widespread denouncements from political moderates, business leaders and pro-immigrant organizations.

•••

Trump defies congressional Republican leaders by reaching out to Democrats Chuck Schumer and Nancy Pelosi and cutting a deal with them on Hurricane Harvey relief and an increase in the debt limit, circumventing a possible government shutdown.

Week 34 (Sept. 10-16)

Pelosi and Schumer announce that they have negotiated a deal with Trump to protect Dreamers without funding for the border wall as a string attached. The White House denies it after right wing media erupts with outrage. Whatever they agreed to goes nowhere.

•••

Visiting yet another hurricane zone — Florida’s southwest coast, which has been pounded by Irma — Trump brushes off a question about whether the storm is an indication of climate change. “If you go back into the 1930s and the 1940s, and you take a look, we’ve had storms over the years that have been bigger than this,” he says.

Week 35 (Sept. 17-23)

In a speech to the U.N. General Assembly, Trump says the U.S. will “totally destroy” North Korea in defense of itself or its allies, and says of Kim Jong Un, “Rocket man is on a suicide mission for himself and his regime.” Trump follows up by ordering new sanctions on North Korea.

•••

After Trump follows up on his comment by ordering new sanctions on North Korea, Kim responds by calling Trump a “mentally deranged U.S. dotard” and says he will make the president “pay dearly” for his threat to destroy North Korea.

•••

At a General Assembly luncheon, Trump repeatedly refers to Namibia as “Nambia.” He also brags about how his friends are going to Africa “to get rich,” which is described as tone-deaf given criticism that Western companies are exploiting Africa’s natural resources.

•••

In a rally, Trump uses a profanity to describe NFL players who stand during the national anthem in silent, peaceful protests against police brutality.

““Wouldn’t you love to see one of these NFL owners, when somebody disrespects our flag, to say, get that son of a (expletive) off the field right now. He is fired,” Trump says.

•••

Hurricane Maria slams into Puerto Rico, knocking out power across the entire island and causing massive flooding as it dumps as much as 30 inches of rain in some areas in one day. Trump issues a state of emergency for Puerto Rico, then travels to his golf club in New Jersey for the weekend.

•••

In an interview, Stephen Curry from the NBA champion Golden State Warriors says he would vote against visiting the White House to celebrate their title. Trump sees the comments and rescinds the team’s invitation.

Week 36 (Sept. 24-30)

Five days after Maria hits Puerto Rico, Trump administration officials arrive on the devastated island for the first time. By then, the government response is already drawing widespread criticism comparing it to Hurricane Katrina. Millions of Puerto Ricans are left without access to clean drinking water, hospitals remain closed, meals are undeliverable because of infrastructure damage, and the electrical and communications systems lay in ruins.

•••

At a news conference, San Juan Mayor Carmen Yulin Cruz says, “We are dying, and you are killing us with the inefficiency, and the bureaucracy. This is what we got last night. Four pallets of water, three pallets of meals, and 12 pallets of infant food — which, I gave them to the people of Comerio, where people are drinking off a creek. So I am done being polite. I am done being politically correct. I am mad as hell.”

•••

Trump issues an angry response to Yulin that will draw criticism of him for victim-blaming: “… Such poor leadership ability by the Mayor of San Juan, and others in Puerto Rico, who are not able to get their workers to help. They want everything to be done for them when it should be a community effort. 10,000 Federal workers now on Island doing a fantastic job.”

•••

Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price resigns in disgrace after media reports show he has splurged on private charter flights at a cost of more than $400,000 to U.S. taxpayers.

Politico reports that despite expectations for government officials to travel commercially, Price has gone on at least two dozen charter flights since May.

•••

The Washington Post reports that the EPA contracted to build a $43,000 soundproof booth in EPA Director Scott Pruitt’s office.

•••

The third quarter of 2017 closes with GDP growth of 2.8 percent.

Week 37 (Oct. 1-7)

Humor cop: Trump lashes out at late-night comics in a tweet complaining about “their very ‘unfunny’ ” material and asking, “Should (Republicans) get Equal Time?” Critics point out that the FCC’s equal time requirement applies to campaigns and is not meant to protect anyone from being the butt of jokes.

•••

On Oct. 3, Trump visits Puerto Rico, where he tosses rolls of paper towels to survivors and appears to minimize the humanitarian crisis on the island by contrasting Maria to “a real catastrophe like Katrina.”

•••

Trump visits Las Vegas the next day, where he praises law enforcement officers, first responders, hospital workers, survivors and heroes in the crowd that night for their actions during the Oct. 1 mass shooting. Surrounded by officers and emergency responders at Metro headquarters, he says, “While everyone else was crouching, police officers were standing up as targets just trying to direct people and tell them where to go. Words cannot describe the bravery that the whole world witnessed on Sunday night.” Referring to others who gave assistance, he says, “Some of them were very badly wounded, and they were badly wounded because they refused to leave. People leaving ambulances to have somebody else go because they thought they were hurt even more so.” He refuses to discuss whether he believes the shooting calls for the need for gun safety laws, saying, “We’re not going to talk about that today.”

•••

During a White House speech, Trump seems to suggest he thinks the F-35 fighter is invisible. “You literally can’t see it. It’s hard to fight a plane you can’t see,” he says of the stealth aircraft.

•••

The stock market closes Oct. 2 with the Dow Jones industrial average over 22,500 for the first time. Power is still not restored in Puerto Rico and a humanitarian crisis there deepens.

Week 38 (Oct. 8-14)

Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Bob Corker, who supported Trump’s campaign, warns that Trump’s statements about foreign leaders are threatening to trigger World War III. He adds that a small group of Trump advisers are all that “separate the country from chaos.” He goes on to call the White House an “adult day care center.”

•••

Upset over an NBC News report that Rex Tillerson referred to him as a “moron,” Trump offers to compare IQ tests with the secretary of state. He also issues a tweet with authoritarian overtones, saying perhaps the network’s license should be revoked for criticizing him.

•••

Trump nominates Kelly protégé Kirstjen Nielsen to direct Homeland Security.

•••

Having failed to meet his campaign promise of repealing and replacing Obamacare despite having Republican majorities in both chambers of Congress, Trump signs orders undercutting the ACA in two key ways — eliminating billions of dollars in subsidies to private health insurers covering low-income Americans, and making it more convenient for Americans to purchase stripped-down health plans that are inexpensive but do not cover such essential needs as maternity and postnatal care, prescription drugs and addiction treatment.

•••

As the House nears a vote on a $36.5 billion aid package for Puerto Rico, Trump lashes out with a tweet: “We cannot keep FEMA, the Military & the First Responders, who have been amazing (under the most difficult circumstances) in P.R. forever!”

The hurricane hit three weeks earlier. By this point, 90 percent of the island remains without power, and full restoration of electricity isn’t expected until March.

Week 39 (Oct. 15-21)

In a profile of Pence, The New Yorker reports that Trump once joked that the vice president “wants to hang” all gay people.

•••

The widow of a U.S. soldier killed in Niger says Trump struggled to remember her husband’s name during a call meant to console her. She also says Trump told her, “He knew what he signed up for … but when it happens, it hurts anyway.”

•••

Trump denies that he forgot the name of the soldier, Sgt. La David Johnson.

Trump also makes a patently false claim that Obama didn’t make calls to families grieving the deaths of service members.

•••

Kelly lashes out at Rep. Frederica Wilson, who was on the call with Johnson’s widow and disclosed details of it. Kelly calls her an “empty barrel” and says she lied about the circumstances in a speech she had made earlier.

Week 40 (Oct. 22-28)

Corker, during an appearance on “Good Morning America,” says Trump should “leave it to the professionals for a while” on North Korea. When Trump criticizes him on Twitter, Corker fires back, “#AlertTheDaycareStaff.”

•••

In a speech to the Senate, Arizona Republican Jeff Flake says, “We must never regard as ‘normal’ the regular and casual undermining of our democratic norms and ideals.” The comments reveal a growing rift within the GOP about whether Trump is fit to serve, but they also show the strength of loyalty to Trump among some Republicans. Two years into his presidency, there still has been no significant effort within the party to take steps to constrain Trump.

•••

Yeah, but can he sing?: Trump tweets birthday wishes to the wrong Lee Greenwood.

Week 41 (Oct. 29-Nov. 4)

A major development in the Russia investigation occurs when Manafort and an associate, Rick Gates, are charged in a 12-count indictment that includes allegations of money laundering and acting as unregistered agents of Ukraine’s former pro-Russian government.

•••

Newly released court documents also show that during a closed hearing earlier in the month, Trump campaign adviser George Papadopoulos pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI about his contacts with Russian officials.

•••

A man who will later tell investigators he was inspired by Islamic State recruiting videos steers a rented truck down a bicycle/pedestrian pathway in New York City, killing eight and wounding 11. Trump immediately calls for Homeland Security to step up its vetting program, and later calls for the suspect to be executed. His reaction stands in contrast to his response to the Oct. 1 shooting in Las Vegas, where he declined to discuss gun violence.

Week 42 (Nov. 5-11)

After Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore is accused of sexually harassing women and girls as young as 14, White House spokeswoman Sarah Huckabee Sanders says Trump would want Moore, a Republican, to step aside if the accusations are true.

•••

The Trump administration announces it is ending Temporary Protected Status for about 2,000 Nicaraguans who have been living legally in the U.S. for many years under a provision effective January 2019.

Week 43 (Nov. 12-18)

When Sen. Al Franken, D-Minn., is accused of sexually harassing a radio news anchor in 2006, Trump reacts quickly on Twitter, calling a photo of the incident “really bad” and referring to Franken as Al Frankenstein. Critics note that Trump has not commented directly on the accusations against Moore nor about the 19 women who accuse Trump of molesting them. Speaking to reporters later in the week, Trump defends Moore.

•••

After the father of UCLA basketball star LiAngelo Ball downplays Trump’s role in arranging for the release of Ball and two teammates from China, where they were accused of shoplifting during a team trip there, Trump lashes out at him on Twitter: “Now that the three basketball players are out of China and saved from years in jail, LaVar Ball, the father of LiAngelo, is unaccepting of what I did for his son and that shoplifting is no big deal. I should have left them in jail!”

•••

Trump comes away from his meeting with Philippines President Rodrigo Duterte saying the two have a “great relationship” and Duterte is doing an “unbelievable job.” Trump doesn’t respond to questions about whether he pressed Duterte on human rights in connection to the thousands of extrajudicial killings that have been committed by government operatives in Duterte’s crackdown on drugs.

Week 44 (Nov. 19-25)

Amid calls by several leading Republicans for Moore to step aside as the child molestation accounts get louder, Trump defends the candidate and says he may campaign for him.

•••

The administration announces it will end Temporary Protected Status for Haitians effective in July 2019. The change would affect about 60,000 Haitian immigrants — many of whom have been living legally in the U.S. for a number of years.

•••

The national unemployment rate falls to 3.7 percent, a nearly 50-year low.

Week 45 (Nov. 26-Dec. 2)

During an event to honor the World War II Navajo code talkers, Trump uses the opportunity to mock Sen. Elizabeth Warren with his often-used “Pocahontas” insult. Trump is criticized for being racially insensitive to Native Americans and disrespecting veterans.

•••

Trump tweets three misleading anti-Muslim and anti-immigrant videos originally posted by Britain First, a nationalist group in the U.K. that routinely posts fake videos. British Prime Minister Theresa May and many others rebuke him.

•••

Amid the furor, Trump claims he knew nothing about Britain First before posting the videos. “If you’re telling me these are horrible people, horrible racist people, I would certainly apologize if you’d like me to do that,” Trump tells Piers Morgan in a televised interview.

•••

Flynn pleads guilty to lying to the FBI about his contacts with the Russian abassador Kislyak, and says he is cooperating in the Russia investigation. Court records indicate that in his dealings with the diplomat, Flynn was acting in consultation with Kushner and at least one other senior Trump transition official, reportedly KT McFarland.

•••

Trump takes to Twitter to defend Flynn and accuse the Justice Department of unfairness in prosecuting Flynn but not Hillary Clinton. In doing so, however, Trump says for the first time that he had to fire Flynn “because he lied to the Vice President and the FBI.” This prompts legal experts to say Trump has inadvertently provided evidence of obstruction of justice by indicating he knew Flynn had lied to the FBI when he asked Comey to drop his investigation of him.

•••

Defending his proposed tax plan from criticism that it will disproportionately benefit the wealthiest Americans, Trump falsely claims the proposal will “cost me a fortune.” An NBC News analysis of the plan finds it will save Trump $20 million.

Week 46 (Dec. 3-9)

Trump formally endorses Moore in Alabama’s Dec. 12 special election.

•••

Trump’s personal lawyer, John Dowd, says a sitting president cannot be found guilty of obstructing justice because “he is the chief law enforcement officer under [the Constitution’s Article II] and has every right to express his view of any case.”

•••

In announcing that the U.S. will recognize Jerusalem as Israel’s capital, Trump noticeably slurs his speech. Trump’s doctors will later tell reporters that cold medication was to blame.

•••

Trump signs a short-term spending bill to keep the government running, but calls for Congress to provide $5 billion in the next bill for a border wall.

Week 47 (Dec. 10-16)

Trump suffers a political blow when Moore loses. Trump immediately distances himself from Moore.

“The reason I originally endorsed Luther Strange (and his numbers went up mightily), is that I said Roy Moore will not be able to win the General Election,” Trump tweets. “I was right!”

•••

Asked whether he would pardon Flynn, Trump leaves the possibility open. Critics complain that dangling a pardon possibility is potentially obstruction of justice and witness tampering.

•••

Juris ignorance: Matthew Petersen, a Trump nominee for a lifetime federal judge position, withdraws after a confirmation hearing in which he fails to answer several basic questions about the law, admits he has never handled a trial at any level and has taken fewer than five depositions.

Week 48 (Dec. 17-23)

Congress gives final approval to the Trump/GOP tax plan, and Trump signs it. The Joint Committee on Taxation reports that the plan will initially result in a reduction for all taxpayers, but the lion’s share of the benefit goes to the wealthiest Americans and there will be an increase for taxpayers earning up to $75,000 by 2027. Meanwhile, it will add an estimated $1.46 billion to the federal deficit over a decade.

•••

O, glorious leader: At a White House gathering to celebrate the tax plan, Republicans seem to compete to see who can offer the most lavish praise of Trump. The unofficial winner is Tennessee Rep. Diane Black. “Thank you, President Trump, for allowing us to have you as our president and to make America great again,” she says.

•••

Trump announces that the U.S. will no longer consider climate change as a national security threat. This is despite federal agencies still reporting that climate change will devastate global economies and security.

Week 49 (Dec. 24-30)

Trump brags that his administration has signed more legislation than any other, a blatantly false claim. Days earlier, govtrack.us reported: “Trump has sunk to last place with 94 bills signed into law by his 336th day in office. That’s eight fewer than President George W. Bush and not even half as many as presidents Bill Clinton (209) and George H.W. Bush (242).”

Week 50 (Dec. 31-Jan. 6)

Responding to a New Year’s Day speech by Kim, a size-anxious Trump tweets that he has a “much bigger & more powerful” nuclear button than the North Korean leader.

•••

Reacting to the publication of “Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House,” which portrays Trump as unhinged and unfit to serve as president, Trump tweets that he would “qualify as not smart, but genius….and a very stable genius at that!”

•••

In the book, Bannon says the June 2016 Trump Tower meeting was “treasonous” and “unpatriotic,” and that “the chance that Don Jr. did not walk these jumos up to his father’s office on the 26th floor is zero.” Trump lashes out, saying Bannon “not only lost his job, he lost his mind.”

•••

Trump disbands the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity after it finds no evidence of widespread voter fraud.

•••

The fourth quarter of 2017 closes with GDP growth of 2.3 percent. Year-over-year, the GDP also increased 2.3 percent from 2016.

•••

The stock market closes Jan. 4 with the Dow Jones industrial average over 25,000 for the first time.

Week 51 (Jan. 7-13)

Axios reports that Trump has begun starting his official day at 11 a.m. and cutting down on meetings so that he can take three hours of “executive time” in the morning. The report says Trump spends most of that time in his private residence watching TV and using Twitter.

•••

Trump cancels Temporary Protected Status for El Salvadorans, leaving about 200,000 immigrants from that country facing uncertainty.

•••

The Washington Post breaks the news that during a White House meeting on immigration, Trump refers to El Salvador, Haiti and African nations as “s**thole countries” and asks why the U.S. should continue accepting residents from those countries. Further, he suggests the U.S. should instead allow entry by immigrants from nations like Norway, which is predominantly white, reinvigorating criticism that Trump is racist.

•••

Democratic Sen. Dick Durbin confirms that Trump made the comment, and the White House doesn’t deny it. Trump, however, seems to deny it, tweeting that there was “tough” language during the meeting but that the comment “was not the language used.”

•••

The Wall Street Journal breaks the Stormy Daniels story, reporting that Cohen paid the adult film actress $130,000 to keep her from revealing that she and the president had sex in 2006 not long after Trump married Melania. Cohen denies it.

•••

The nonprofit Environmental Data & Governance Initiative reports that the EPA and several government agencies have removed or reduced their web content about climate change.

•••

In an interview with CNN’s Jake Tapper regarding “Fire and Fury,” Trump senior adviser Stephen Miller displays the zeal of a true believer in calling the president a “political genius” and “a self-made billionaire who revolutionized reality TV and changed the course of our politics.” After 12 minutes of hyperbolic praise and combative CNN trashing by Miller, Tapper cuts the interview short. Miller refuses to leave, and security is called to escort him out.

Week 52 (Jan. 14-20)

Amid the furor over his “s**thole countries” remark, Trump tells a reporter that he is “the least racist person you will ever interview.”

•••

What goes around …: A company that tracks the spread of misinformation online says Trump hotels have been deluged with fake reviews calling the properties “s**tholes.”

•••

Stormy speaks: In an interview with the entertainment publication In Touch, Daniels describes unimpressive sex with Trump months after Melania gave birth to Barron Trump. The encounter occurred at a Lake Tahoe hotel suite during a celebrity golf tournament, she says. Trump called her repeatedly afterward, she says.

•••

The government partially shuts down after the Senate fails to pass a funding bill, gridlocked over demands by Senate Democrats to include a DACA resolution in the measure. Three days later, the Senate reaches a stopgap deal after Democrats say Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has assured them he will allow debate on DACA.

•••

In a bizarre news conference to announce the results of a physical and cognitive examination of Trump, White House physician Ronny Jackson gives an over-the-top assessment of the president’s health. He says Trump “might live to be 200 years old” if he’d have had a better diet, and describes the president as being in excellent health — even though Trump is visibly overweight, sleeps four to five hours a night and eats a diet heavy in fast food and sugar.

Week 53 (Jan. 21-27)

The Justice Department reveals that Sessions has been questioned as part of the Mueller investigation. Sessions becomes the first known Cabinet member to be interviewed.

•••

Trump gives his State of the Union address, in which he urges bipartisan support on such issues as infrastructure and immigration. Democrats do a collective eye-roll, expressing extreme doubt that Trump is sincere about working with them. Despite multiple “infrastructure weeks,” Trump never moves forward with a plan.

•••

The administration loosens a Clinton-era policy aimed at reducing toxic air pollution from industrial sources.

Week 54 (Jan. 28-Feb. 3)

Damn those Dems: In a speech in Cincinnati, Trump says it was “un-American” and perhaps even treasonous that Democrats didn’t stand and cheer for his State of the Union speech.

•••

Trump becomes the first president not to be interviewed on Super Bowl Sunday since George W. Bush started doing it in 2004. Trump instead issues a statement in which he supports standing for the national anthem.

•••

Over the objections of the FBI and Department of Justice, Trump orders the release of a previously classified memo on the Russia investigation from House Intelligence Chairman Devin Nunes, R-Calif. Trump and top Republicans say it vindicates the president by proving political bias on the part of investigators. Democrats say it’s a mischaracterization of the facts and leaves out critical context.

Week 55 (Feb. 4-10)

White House staff secretary Rob Porter resigns amid reports that he physically abused his two ex-wives. The situation will become crippling for Kelly, who is accused of knowing about the allegations for months before they became public, and covering them up.

•••

An Indiana prosecutor criticizes Trump for politicizing the case of an undocumented immigrant accused of killing Indianapolis Colts linebacker Edwin Jackson and another man. The prosecutor calls Trump’s comments on the matter “ghoulish and inappropriate.”

•••

A year after the administration pledged to replace the White House Spanish language website it removed immediately after Trump took office, there’s still no new site.

•••

Nevadans go on high alert after Time magazine publishes a cover story saying the White House has considered conducting a nuclear test at the Nevada National Security Site as a show of force. Gov. Brian Sandoval immediately calls the White House and soon reports that he has “100 percent confirmation” that the test won’t happen.

•••

The second government shutdown of 2018 occurs, once again due to partisan gridlock over DACA and border issues.

Week 56 (Feb. 11-17)

A gunman opens fire at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., killing 17 students and faculty members, and injuring 17 others. Trump offers prayers and condolences, but focuses on mental health issues as opposed to gun safety. Outraged student survivors respond by launching a nationwide movement for sensible gun legislation.

•••

Stoneman Douglas sophomore Sarah Chadwick responds: “I don’t want your condolences you (expletive) piece of (expletive), my friends and teachers were shot.”

•••

The Stormy story changes, part I: After The New York Times publishes a story saying Daniels was in fact paid hush money, Cohen acknowledges it but says he paid her out of his own pocket.

•••

Former Playboy Playmate Karen McDougal claims she had a nine-month affair with Trump two years into his marriage with Melania. It will be revealed that McDougal was paid for her story and her silence by Trump allies at the National Enquirer, who promptly killed it.

•••

The administration proposes massive cutbacks in research on renewable energy and programs designed to study and mitigate the effects of climate change.

•••

McMaster says there is “incontrovertible” evidence that Russia meddled in the election. Trump continues to take Putin’s word over the word of the U.S. intelligence community.

•••

Mueller unveils indictments against 13 Russian nationals on charges of interfering with the election, including supporting Trump’s campaign and opposing Hillary Clinton. The indictments are the first tied directly to Russian meddling in the election.

Week 57 (Feb. 18-24)

At a “listening session” in the aftermath of the Parkland shooting, Trump expresses support for arming teachers. He’s also called for a ban on bump stocks and expressed support for raising the legal age to 21 to purchase some types of weapons. But he’ll quickly reverse these positions, claiming there was “not much political support” for the measures.

•••

Trump enters the meeting holding a card containing five handwritten notes, including “I hear you” and “What can we do to help you feel safe?” Critics are mystified: Why he would need the prompts to show sympathy for grieving students and families?

•••

A memo from McMaster confirms that Trump has asked for a Red Square-type military parade for the U.S. in Washington.

Week 58 (Feb. 25-March 3)

No more Hope: After defending Porter, whom she’d been dating, White House communications director Hope Hicks resigns.

•••

In a private speech to Republican donors at Mar-a-Lago, Trump says “it’s great” that Xi Jinping became the Chinese “president for life,” and that “maybe we’ll have to give that a shot some day.”

Week 59 (March 4-10)

A proposal to name a Utah highway after Trump draws opposition, including from a lawmaker who suggests adding a Stormy Daniels exit to the road.

•••

Reports emerge that Trump will meet with Kim.

•••

A federal oversight office says Conway violated the Hatch Act by speaking in support of Moore. The law prohibits government officials from using their positions to influence political campaigns. No action, punishment or apology comes from the White House. Instead, the White House denies she committed the violation.

Week 60 (March 11-17)

Rex becomes an ex: Trump ousts Tillerson, with whom he’d clashed on Korea, Russia and Iran. He replaces Tillerson with CIA Director Mike Pompeo. Trump’s IQ challenge with Tillerson never happens.

•••

Mueller subpoenas the Trump Organization, the first time the special prosecutor is known to demand materials directly related to Trump’s businesses.

•••

John McEntee, Trump’s longtime personal aide, is fired after becoming the target of an investigation by the Department of Homeland Security for financial crimes.

•••

The Federal Emergency Management Agency drops the words “climate change” and associated terms from its strategic plan. FEMA’s stance doesn’t affect the climate, which continues to wreak havoc.

•••

Trump replaces top economic adviser Gary Cohn with television pundit Larry Kudlow.

•••

Newly disclosed documents show that Trump Organization lawyer Jill Martin was involved in legal efforts to keep Daniels from revealing her story, belying Cohen’s claim that the Trump Organization wasn’t involved.

•••

Lying to allies is a good thing? Trump brags in a fundraising speech that he made up information during a meeting with Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau by saying the U.S. was running a trade deficit with Canada. The claim was false.

•••

Absentee critic: During an interview on “60 Minutes,” DeVos laments the state of public schools while espousing school choice. Interviewer Lesley Stahl asks if DeVos has visited any underperforming public schools. DeVos admits she has not.

•••

Trump proposes the establishment of a Space Force as a separate branch of the U.S. military. He’s mocked by late-night comics and internet commenters. A number of military experts say space operations could stay within the Air Force, and that creating a separate force would generate needless bureaucracy.

Week 61 (March 18-24)

Trump ousts McMaster. The two had clashed on numerous issues, including McMaster’s support for escalating the war in Afghanistan and his public statement that there was “incontrovertible” evidence of Russian meddling. Trump names far right wing darling and Fox News commentator John Bolton as his third national security adviser in a little more than a year. Trump does so despite reportedly expressing doubts about Bolton’s mustache — an unusual concern for a national security adviser.

•••

Trump signs a $1.3 trillion omnibus bill that circumvents another government shutdown but is upset that it doesn’t include the $25 billion he’d sought for the border wall. “I will never sign another bill like this again,” he says. Illegal border crossings remain at close to decades-long lows.

•••

Member of the jet set: Politico reports that Pruitt has spent more than $105,000 on first-class flights during his first year as EPA director.

•••

The U.S. imposes tariffs of 25 percent and 10 percent on imports of steel and aluminum, respectively, from China. Trump insists trade wars are easy to win but appears confused on who actually ends up paying for them.

•••

Trump calls Putin to congratulate him on his re-election, drawing outcry from Republicans and Democrats alike. Later, a leaked copy of Trump’s briefing materials shows that aides warned him “DO NOT CONGRATULATE.”

Week 62 (March 25-31)

Trump ousts Veterans Affairs Secretary David Shulkin and nominates presidential physician Jackson to replace him. Trump reportedly liked Jackson’s performance during the doctor’s over-the-top report on the president’s physical examination. However …

•••

… The nomination is a disaster. Not only does Jackson have limited management experience, but he soon faces a rash of accusations of creating a hostile work environment, drinking on the job and improperly dispensing medication. He withdraws from consideration in April.

•••

The stench around Pruitt gets stronger. ABC News reports that for much of Pruitt’s first year in office, he has rented a condo co-owned by the wife of a prominent energy lobbyist. Bloomberg will later report that Pruitt paid $50 per night, far below market value.

•••

The first quarter of 2018 closes with GDP growth of 2.2 percent.

Week 63 (April 1-7)

The administration takes another step toward a crisis of its own making when Sessions announces a zero tolerance policy on border crossings, directing federal officials to prosecute all adult migrants entering the U.S. illegally. Because federal law bars children from being held in detention facilities with their parents, the policy leads to separation of hundreds and then thousands of families at the border.

•••

Trump begins tweeting about caravans of immigrants moving toward the U.S. from Central America.

•••

China imposes 15 to 25 percent tariffs on a range of U.S. products.

•••

Trump calls for 2,000 to 4,000 National Guard troops to be sent to the border. Nevada Gov. Brian Sandoval says he won’t deploy state troops.

•••

It’s revealed that Trump invited Putin to the White House during a March 20 phone call. The news comes as a shock to European allies and Trump aides, but the meeting never materializes.

•••

Trump makes his first comment about the payment to Daniels, saying he has no knowledge of it. “You’ll have to ask Michael Cohen. Michael Cohen is my attorney,” Trump says.

Week 64 (April 8-14)

Mueller’s team steps it up another notch with a raid on Cohen’s office. Furious, Trump calls the investigation “an attack on our country.”

•••

In interviews preceding the release of his book “A Higher Loyalty: Truth, Lies and Leadership,” Comey calls Trump “untethered to truth” and compares him to a mafia don. Trump responds by calling Comey an “untruthful slimeball.”

•••

Bolton pushes out homeland security adviser Tom Bossert, a close ally of McMaster.

•••

In testimony before a House committee, Nielson clouds the family separation issue by claiming there is no policy calling for separations as a deterrent.

Week 65 (April 15-21)

As public awareness of child separations grows, so does outcry. Congressional Democrats prompt an investigation by the Homeland Security inspector general into whether the agency is improperly separating families.

•••

The crisis comes into clearer focus: The New York Times publishes the first report examining the scale of family separations. It says more than 700 children have been taken from their parents since October, including 100 under the age of 4.

•••

During a court hearing, Cohen is forced to admit that his clients include Fox News host Sean Hannity. Hannity is criticized for not revealing his connection to Cohen in commenting about Trump.

Week 66 (April 22-28)

Backlash to child separations explodes, as the separations draw condemnation from Democratic and Republican leaders, former first ladies, child welfare experts, religious organizations, business leaders and others.

•••

A federal judge rules against Trump in a lawsuit challenging his September decision to phase out DACA.

•••

The Stormy story changes, part II: After initially denying he knew anything about Cohen’s payments to Daniels, Trump tells Fox News that Cohen “represented me with this crazy Stormy Daniels deal.” “There was no campaign funds going into this, which would have been a problem,” he says.

Week 67 (April 29-May 5)

After newly released documents show that Trump disclosed making payments to Cohen, Trump acknowledges publicly that he repaid Cohen for the hush money given to Daniels. He claims the money had nothing to do with the campaign.

•••

Rudy’s rough start: Rudy Giuliani, who has been added to Trump’s legal team, stuns the White House by suggesting on Fox News that the payment to Daniels was made because Trump was in the stretch run of his campaign. Trump says Giuliani needs to “get his facts straight.”

•••

Wait, wasn’t Obama the one who was supposed to be taking the guns away?: It’s reported that attendees at the NRA’s national convention will be allowed to carry their guns, but not during a forum in which Trump and Pence will speak.

Week 68 (May 6-12)

Sessions doubles down on the zero-tolerance policy at the border, acknowledging that it will require children to be separated from their parents and suggesting that the purpose is to deter immigration.

•••

Kelly shifts on separations again, saying they can be “a tough deterrent.”

Week 69 (May 13-19)

Nielsen directly contradicts Kelly, denying to a Senate committee that Trump ordered separations as a deterrent even though Kelly spoke about using it as a deterrent early in the Trump administration.

•••

During a meeting with California officials upset about sanctuary laws, Trump refers to immigrant gang members as “animals.” His dehumanizing comment adds to the furor over family separations.

•••

Senate Intelligence Committee leaders issue a statement saying they agree with U.S. intelligence officials that Russia interfered in the election. Trump reacts with a tweet saying “The only Collusion was that done by Democrats who were unable to win an Election despite the spending of far more money!”

•••

A shooting at a high school near Houston leaves 10 dead and more than a dozen wounded. Trump: “Early reports not looking good. God bless all!”

•••

Trump meets with parents of the shooting victims. Rhonda Hart, whose 14-year-old daughter, Kimberly Vaughan, was killed in the shooting, says Trump repeatedly used the word “wacky” to describe the shooter and seems obsessed with arming teachers as a solution to school security. “It was like talking to a toddler,” she says.

Week 70 (May 20-26)

Trump asks the Justice Department to investigate whether his campaign was infiltrated or surveilled by its agents or the FBI during the Obama administration.

•••

Trump announces he will pardon conservative commentator Dinesh D’Souza, who pleaded guilty to federal campaign finance law violations.

Week 71 (May 27-June 2)

Trump contradicts himself again on his reason for firing Comey: “Not that it matters but I never fired James Comey because of Russia!”

Week 72 (June 3-9)

Giuliani says in a televised interview that it’s an “open question” as to whether Trump can pardon himself. Trump sends a tweet on the matter: “As has been stated by numerous legal scholars, I have the absolute right to PARDON myself, but why would I do that when I have done nothing wrong?’’ Most legal scholars challenge this idea.

•••

The U.S. imposes tariffs on steel and aluminum products from all countries except Australia, Argentina, Brazil, Japan and South Korea. Mexico retaliates by imposing tariffs on U.S. products worth $3.6 billion. Apparently the “easily winnable” trade war is not won yet.

•••

After several members of the Super Bowl champion Philadelphia Eagles say they’ll decline to visit the White House, Trump rescinds the team’s invitation. Yet …

•••

… He announces he’s considering a pardon for the late boxer and social activist Muhammad Ali, who also protested against racial discrimination. But …

•••

Ali’s family notifies Trump that no pardon is needed, as Ali’s conviction for failing to report for induction into the service was overturned by the Supreme Court in 1971.

Week 73 (June 10-16)

Trump upends the G7 summit and insults Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. During a news conference announcing the signing of a communique by all seven nations, Trudeau mentions that Canada “will not be pushed around” by the U.S. with its tariffs. Once safely aboard Air Force One and flying away, Trump reacts by saying the U.S. will not endorse the communique and calling Trudeau “very dishonest & weak.”

•••

After his historic summit with Kim, Trump heaps praise on the North Korean dictator, calling him “a very worthy, smart negotiator” and saying, “I do trust him, yeah.” Critics point to the comments as another instance of Trump attacking allies and praising foes.

•••

Trump tweets after the summit that “there is no longer a Nuclear Threat from North Korea.” Less than two weeks later, newly released satellite images will indicate that North Korea is upgrading a major nuclear research facility, belying Trump’s claim that it has vowed to disarm.

•••

In a Fox News interview, Trump compliments Kim’s authoritarian rule. “He speaks and his people sit up at attention. I want my people to do the same,” he says. Trump later claims he was being sarcastic.

•••

Sessions makes a speech in which he uses a biblical passage to defend the zero-tolerance policy and family separations.

“I would cite you to the Apostle Paul and his clear and wise command in Romans 13, to obey the laws of the government because God has ordained them for the purpose of order,” he says. “Orderly and lawful processes are good in themselves and protect the weak and lawful.”

Critics point out that Sessions fails to mention that such biblical characters as Mary, Joseph and baby Jesus were refugees as well.

•••

Trump announces $50 billion in trade tariffs against China.

•••

Trump lies and blames Democrats for family separations and says the matter can only be resolved by Congress. Meanwhile, Homeland Security reveals for the first time how many children have been separated since the zero-tolerance policy went into effect — 2,000, and some are younger than a year old.

•••

The New York attorney general’s office files a civil suit against the Trump Foundation, Trump and his three eldest children, alleging they violated federal and state charities law with a “persistent” pattern of conduct that included unlawful coordination with the 2016 Trump presidential campaign.

Week 74 (June 17-23)

Nielsen says the administration will not apologize over family separations. “This administration has a simple message — If you cross the border illegally, we will prosecute you,” she says.

•••

ProPublica releases recordings from inside a detention center where children who’ve been separated from their families are being housed. Cries of “Mama” and “Papi” can be heard over and over, and some children wail inconsolably. Also on the recording is the voice of an adult supervisor. “Well, we have an orchestra here,” he jokes. “What’s missing is a conductor.”

•••

The recordings and other revelations from the border — including the existence of a no-hugging policy in which children are prohibited from being touched by their siblings or staff — causes outcry to boil over. An aggregate of four polls shows that two-thirds of Americans oppose the policy.

•••

Melania Trump boards a plane to visit the border wearing an Army green jacket with the words “I really don’t care. Do U?” printed in white on the back. A spokeswoman says the garment is just a jacket and has no message. The first lady later completely changes that story, saying the message was a swipe at the mainstream media.

•••

Trump is forced to blink: Belying his earlier claim that family separations were being caused by an inflexible law and not by a policy he could reverse, Trump signs an executive order aimed at keeping families together.

•••

The European Union imposes tariffs on U.S. products worth $3.2 billion. The “easy to win” trade war continues.

•••

Hundreds of people turn out in triple-digit heat to protest Trump when he appears at the Suncoast resort in Las Vegas to campaign for Republican candidates.

Week 75 (June 24-30)

Five journalists die after a gunman enters a newspaper office in Annapolis, Md., prompting fresh concerns over the ramifications of Trump’s anti- media rhetoric. After the mayor of Annapolis says the administration has denied his requestto lower flags, Trump gives the order.

•••

The Supreme Court upholds Trump’s travel ban on a 5-4 vote.

•••

A federal judge in California orders immigration authorities to reunite separated children within 30 days — 14 days for children younger than 5.

•••

As federal officials begin to comply with the court order, attorneys reveal that immigrant children as young as 3 are being ordered into court unaccompanied by adults. This isn’t a new practice, but attorneys say more children are being sent to court alone.

•••

Trump threatens to tax Harley-Davidson “like never before” after the manufacturer announces that Trump’s steel and aluminum tariffs have forced it to move some production overseas.

•••

The second quarter of 2018 closes with GDP growth of 4.2 percent.

•••

After Rep. Maxine Waters calls for public harassment of Trump administration officials, Trump attacks her in a provocative tweet:“Congresswoman Maxine Waters, an extraordinarily low IQ person, has become, together with Nancy Pelosi, the Face of the Democrat Party. She has just called for harm to supporters, of which there are many, of the Make America Great Again movement. Be careful what you wish for Max!”

Week 76 (July 1-7)

Pruitt leaves in disgrace. The EPA director resigns amid his many ethics scandals, which by now include allegations that he ordered an aide to help him with a number of personal tasks like buying a mattress from the Trump hotel in Washington, and that he retaliated against EPA staffers who had questioned his management and spending decisions.

•••

Trump mocks the #MeToo movement in a campaign rally in Montana, saying it has made it improper to use the phrase “the woman who got away.”

•••

The U.S. imposes a 25 percent tariff on Chinese goods worth $34 billion. China immediately retaliates with an equal tariff. The trade war is affecting U.S. consumers and businesses with higher prices, despite being “easy to win.”

•••

At a rally less than a week after the Annapolis shooting, Trump refers to journalists as “bad people” and says “75 percent of those people are downright dishonest.”

Week 77 (July 8-14)

Trump nominates Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court to succeed retiring Justice Anthony Kennedy.

•••

As he prepares for a trip to Europe that includes a NATO summit in Brussels and a meeting with Putin in Helsinki, Trump says he’s most looking forward to the Putin meeting.

“I have NATO, I have the UK, which is in somewhat turmoil, and I have Putin. Frankly, Putin may be the easiest of them all. Who would think?” he says.

•••

At the NATO summit, Trump shocks U.S. allies by attacking the member nations, particularly Germany, whose leader, Angela Merkel is often regarded as a thoughtful, dignified contrast to Trump. He accuses that nation of being “totally controlled by” and “a captive of Russia,” and says other allies are “delinquent” in their defense spending. Alarmed critics point out that weakening NATO has long been one of Putin’s central global policy goals and Trump appears to be accomplishing that.

•••

Hours before Trump arrives in England to meet British Prime Minister Theresa May, the English tabloid The Sun publishes a story in which Trump criticizes the politically vulnerable May’s handling of Brexit and says former British Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson would make a great prime minister.

•••

Mattis, who originally supported Trump’s Space Force proposal, breaks with the president and sends a letter to Congress urging lawmakers not to make it a separate branch of the military.

•••

Mueller obtains a new indictment charging 12 Russian intelligence officers with stealing information of about 500,000 American voters via a hack of the Democratic Party.

Week 78 (July 15-21)

Trump’s plan to have a private meeting with Putin — only a U.S. translator is in attendance, no other staff — shocks observers. No president has ever sought to prevent senior staff from observing a conversation between the U.S. and Russia. Later it is learned that Trump demanded the translator’s notes from the meeting and destroyed them so no known record of the conversations exists.

In a CBS interview before his meeting with Putin, Trump lists the European Union — which consists entirely of U.S. economic and military allies — as one of America’s biggest foes and says that while Russia and China also are foes, “that doesn’t mean they are bad.”

•••

Another furor erupts over Trump’s performance during a news conference with Putin in Helsinki, Finland, where Trump takes Putin’s word over that of U.S. intelligence officials on whether Russia meddled in the election. He also says he holds both nations responsible for Russia’s interference. Critics call out his visible deference to Putin.

•••

“My people came to me, Dan Coats came to me, some others, they said they think it’s Russia,” Trump says referring to the director of national intelligence. “I have President Putin. He just said it’s not Russia. I will say this, I don’t see any reason why it would be.”

•••

A torrent of criticism erupts, including from U.S. allies and leading Republicans. McCain calls it “one of the most disgraceful performances by an American president in memory.”

“The damage inflicted by President Trump’s naiveté, egotism, false equivalence, and sympathy for autocrats is difficult to calculate,” McCain says.

•••

“So many people at the higher ends of intelligence loved my press conference performance in Helsinki,” Trump tweets, leaving unclear whether he was referring to top spies or smart people.

•••

Trump attempts to backtrack on his Helsinki comments, saying he has full faith in U.S. intelligence officials and misspoke in his remark about Russian involvement.

“I said the word ‘would’ instead of ‘wouldn’t,’ ” he says. “The sentence should have been, ‘I don’t see any reason why it wouldn’t be Russia.’ ”

•••

Sources close to the Cohen investigation say the lawyer secretly recorded Trump discussing a potential payment for a former Playboy model’s account of having an affair with him.

•••

Trump again invites Putin to the White House. Aides who are still dealing with the fallout of Helsinki are stunned, as evidenced by Coats when he’s informed of the invitation while appearing onstage at a security forum. “O … K …,” he says, slowly, “that’s going to be special.” The meeting is eventually put off.

•••

During a Cabinet meeting, Trump says “No,” when asked by a reporter whether he believes Russia is still targeting the U.S. with cyberattacks. Sanders later says Trump was indicating that he would take no more questions.

Week 79 (July 22-28)

The Trump administration announces that it will provide $12 billion in “temporary relief” to farmers who’ve suffered collateral damage from Trump’s “easy to win” trade war.

•••

Cease fire in the trade war: Trump and European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker announce they’ve agreed to postpone car tariffs and work to resolve their dispute on steel and aluminum tariffs while negotiating a bilateral trade deal.

•••

At a VFW rally in Kansas City, Mo., Trump says: “Don’t believe the crap you see from these people, the fake news … What you’re seeing and what you’re reading is not what’s happening.”

Week 80 (July 29-Aug. 4)

Arguing the need for a voter ID law during a rally, Trump falsely claims that picture IDs are required to buy groceries.

•••

In a tweeted rant, Trump again pressures Sessions to shut down the Russia investigation: “This is a terrible situation and Attorney General Jeff Sessions should stop this Rigged Witch Hunt right now, before it continues to stain our country any further.”

•••

Sanders denies that Trump was obstructing justice with the tweet. “It’s not an order. It’s the president’s opinion,” she says. “He’s fighting back.”

•••

Prelude to a scandal: In a letter to Sen. Dianne Feinstein, the top Democrat on the Senate Judiciary Committee, psychology professor Christine Blasey Ford alleges that Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her when they were in high school. At Ford’s request, Feinstein does not release the letter.

•••

The administration unveils a plan to roll back Obama-era fuel mileage standards for automobiles. The standards were designed to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases.

•••

As a September deadline approaches, Trump says he’ll have “no problem” shutting down the government if Congress doesn’t provide more money for border security.

•••

The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals rules that Trump exceeded his authority in limiting federal funding to so-called sanctuary cities.

Week 81 (Aug. 5-11)

As the new NFL season gets underway, Trump resumes his Twitter attack on protesting players: “A football game, that fans are paying soooo much money to watch and enjoy, is no place to protest. Most of that money goes to the players anyway. Find another way to protest. Stand proudly for your National Anthem or be Suspended Without Pay!”

Week 82 (Aug. 12-18)

Trump revokes the security clearance of former CIA director William Brennan, a vocal critic of the president, and announces he’s considering doing the same for several other former officials solely because they’ve criticized him. No national security rationale is presented, and critics point out this will make it harder for intelligence services to confer with past leaders on issues.

•••

Fifteen top former intelligence officials from both Republican and Democratic administrations take the unprecedented step of signing a letter backing Brennan. Sixty former CIA officials submit a similar letter.

•••

A day after officials announce that Trump’s military parade will cost $92 million to stage — and amid ongoing public ridicule of the event — Trump pulls the plug on it.

•••

In an initiative organized by The Boston Globe, hundreds of newspapers publish editorials stressing the importance of press freedoms to a democracy and saying that journalists are not the enemy of the American people.

•••

Reacting to a new book by former White House staffer Omarosa Manigault Newman, the only African-American to have served in a senior role in the West Wing, Trump refers to her by tweet as “that dog.”

•••

Trump does something that was once considered practically unthinkable by encouraging a boycott against an American vehicle maker. In this case, it’s Harley-Davidson.

Week 83 (Aug 19-25)

In one of two bombshell developments this week, Cohen pleads guilty to campaign finance violations and other charges stemming from his collaboration with Trump to pay hush money to Daniels and McDougal. He indicates he’s prepared to work with prosecutors.

•••

Bombshell No. 2: Manafort is convicted on five counts of tax fraud, one count of failure to file a report of foreign bank and financial accounts, and two counts of bank fraud.

•••

The New York Times reports that White House counsel Don McGahn has cooperated extensively with the Mueller team. Trump lashes out on Twitter: “The failing @nytimes wrote a Fake piece today implying that because White House Councel Don McGahn was giving hours of testimony to the Special Councel, he must be a John Dean type “RAT.” But I allowed him and all others to testify – I didn’t have to. I have nothing to hide……”

•••

The U.S. ratchets up the trade war with new tariffs on $16 billion worth of Chinese goods. China immediately responds in kind. The trade war hasn’t been won yet, easily or otherwise.

•••

Darren Beattie, a speechwriter for Trump, is fired after it’s revealed that he appeared at a conference frequently attended by white nationalists.

•••

Paging George Orwell …: Defending Trump’s decision not to perjure himself by appearing before the special counsel, Giuliani — the former New York mayor and ontological expert — says, “truth isn’t truth.”

Week 84 (Aug. 26-Sept. 1)

The day after the death of McCain, the White House raises its flag back to full staff. Amid public outcry, Trump orders it again lowered to half-staff. Trump is not invited to McCain’s funeral Instead he goes golfing. During the service, McCain’s daughter, Meghan, says: “The America of John McCain has no need to be made great again because America was always great.”

•••

Hot on the tail of The New York Times story, the White House announces that McGahn will be leaving the administration in the fall.

•••

Citing budget constraints, Trump cancels pay raises for federal employees that were due to begin in January. Critics point out that the constraints are partially caused by Trump’s massive tax cut for the wealthy.

•••

Trump tweets that the U.S. will halt military exercises in South Korea, setting off alarms in Seoul and at the Pentagon. Only a day earlier, Mattis had said there were no plans to suspend the exercises.

Week 85 (Sept. 2-8)

At a campaign rally in Indiana, Trump blasts the DOJ and FBI, and threatens to intervene, presumably to limit their ability for independent inquiries.

•••

In a new book, “Fear: Trump in the White House,” Washington Post journalist Bob Woodward paints a picture of an administration in dysfunction and disarray, with Trump routinely hiding away watching TV and tweeting for hours on end, erupting at staff members and aides ignoring his directives to circumvent decisions they believed would have disastrous repercussions. Trump calls the book a scam, apparently while watching TV and tweeting.

•••

In an opinion piece published by The New York Times — headlined “I am part of the resistance inside the Trump administration” — an anonymous writer claiming to be a senior official in the administration says aides are indeed opposing dangerous actions and ideas by Trump. The writer further says that some Cabinet members had discussed invoking the 25th Amendment to remove Trump from power because he’s mentally unfit for office.

•••

Trump questions whether the author of the “resistance” commentary committed treason and calls on Sessions to investigate the individual.

•••

Speculation runs rampant over the source of the column. “I have to say, I’m surprised by how good a writer Ivanka is,” late-night talk show host Jimmy Kimmel jokes.

•••

George Papadopoulos is sentenced to 14 days in jail, becoming the first person to be sentenced in connection with the Mueller investigation.

•••

Kavanaugh’s three-day confirmation hearing is held before the Senate Judiciary Committee. Ford’s allegations are not discussed, but Feinstein later sends her letter to the FBI after rumors surface about it being leaked.

Week 86 (Sept. 9-15)

Days after new research shows that upwards of 3,000 people died in Puerto Rico as a result of Hurricane Maria, Trump tweets that the federal government did “an unappreciated great job” and blasts the mayor of San Juan as incompetent. Later, Trump asserts without evidence that “3000 people did not die” and that the figure was concocted by Democrats to “make me look as bad as possible.”

Week 87 (Sept. 16-22)

Ford’s allegations against Kavanaugh go public. In an interview with The Washington Post, she says Kavanaugh assaulted her while heavily intoxicated at a high school party.

•••

Kavanaugh’s confirmation vote is pushed back three days so the committee can question both Ford and Kavanaugh. The story prompts two other women to come forward with similar allegations.

•••

Trump casts doubt on Ford’s allegation in a tweet, saying “if the attack on Dr. Ford was as bad as she says, charges would have been immediately filed with local Law Enforcement Authorities by either her or her loving parents.”

•••

Another escalation of the trade war with China occurs when the U.S. announces tariffs on $200 billion worth of Chinese goods. China responds with tariffs on an additional $60 billion in U.S. products.

•••

The administration reduces the 2019 refugee allowance to 30,000.

•••

The New York Times reports that the Health and Human Services Department has lost track of 1,488 children who were placed with sponsors after being separated from their parents at the border.

•••

In an interview, Trump launches his most pointed attack to date on Sessions: “I don’t have an attorney general.” In the same interview, he calls the Mueller investigation a “cancer on our country.”

•••

During a tour of a neighborhood ravaged by Hurricane Florence, Trump comes across a large yacht that has been washed onto a resident’s property. “At least you got a nice boat out of the deal,” he says. Social media erupts with commenters criticizing Trump for trivializing the plight of hurricane survivors. But …

•••

… Stephen Colbert and his “Late Show” staff turn the comment into gold for charities by using them as the basis for a best-selling book, “Whose boat is this boat? Comments that Don’t Help in the Aftermath of a Hurricane.” Colbert and the staff donate a portion of the proceeds to charitable organizations, raising more than $1.25 million. The spoof is formatted like a children’s book.

Week 88 (Sept. 23-29)

A transfixed nation watches Ford and Kavanaugh testify about Ford’s allegation. Ford says she’s “100 percent” confident her recollection of the incident was accurate. Kavanaugh “categorically and unequivocally” denies it and accuses Democrats of character assassination.

•••

In one of many bizarre moments in his testimony, during an exchange with Sen. Amy Klobuchar in which he alternated between being combative and insolent, Kavanaugh pauses in his celebration of beer (“I like beer… I still like beer, senator… What kind of beer do you like?) the Supreme Court nominee is asked if he ever blacked out drinking. His answer suggests he can not recall: “You’re asking about blackout. I don’t know, have you?”

•••

Amid drama over whether Kavanaugh has enough votes on the committee, the panel agrees to a compromise in which it will move the nomination to the full Senate but also ask Trump to order an FBI investigation into the allegation. Trump agrees to the request but orders the investigation to be completed in one week.

•••

In a speech before the United Nations General Assembly, Trump draws unintended laughter after claiming that his administration “has accomplished more than almost any administration in the history of our country.”

Week 89 (Sept. 30-Oct. 6)

Amid the FBI investigation, Trump mocks Ford during a campaign rally in Missouri. Mischaracterizing her testimony, he says, “How did you get home? I don’t remember. How’d you get there? I don’t remember. Where is the place? I don’t remember. How many years ago was it? I don’t know.” His remarks draw a wave of criticism, including from several congressional Republicans.

•••

On Oct. 6, after the completion of the FBI investigation that critics charge was highly limited in scope, the Senate votes 50-48 to approve Kavanaugh.

•••

Fulfilling a Trump campaign promise, the White House announces that a deal has been struck to replace NAFTA with the USMCA: the US-Mexico-Canada Agreement. The deal is quickly dubbed NAFTA 2.0 and described as a tweak of the former agreement as opposed to a wholesale overhaul.

•••

The New York Times reports that Trump received more than $400 million from his father through means that included tax dodges and fraud. The story contradicts the president’s narrative that he amassed billions in wealth after starting with a $1 million loan from his father.

•••

The third quarter of 2018 closes with GDP growth of 3.5 percent.

Week 90 (Oct. 7-13)

Hurricane Michael roars onto land in the Florida Panhandle as a Category 4 storm, killing dozens and causing more than $14 billion in damage. Trump holds a campaign rally the same day the storm makes landfall despite criticizing Obama in 2012 for appearing at a rally two weeks after Superstorm Sandy.

•••

At Kavanaugh’s swearing-in ceremony, Trump apologizes to the new justice “on behalf of our nation.”

•••

Amid growing global outcry over the slaying of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi, Trump vows “severe punishment” for Saudi Arabia if the regime is found responsible for Khashoggi’s death, but also rejects the idea of sanctions.

•••

In a meeting that will be described as “awkward,” “incredibly bizarre” and “surreal,” Kanye West speaks with Trump at the White House, where he goes on a nearly 10-minute monologue on a range of topics, including saying Trump needs the “flyest” plane for Air Force One and noting thathis MAGA hat makes him feel like Superman.

•••

The EPA announces it will discontinue a scientific review panel that advises about safe levels of air pollution.

•••

After a judge throws out a defamation suit by Daniels against Trump, the president refers to her as “Horseface” in a tweet. In an apparent reference to the size of his genitalia, she replies “Game on, Tiny.”

Week 91 (Oct. 14-20)

In the largest attempted mass political assassination in American history, pipe bombs are mailed to a number of individuals and organizations who have been critical of Trump, including Barack Obama, Hillary Clinton and CNN. The situation prompts numerous calls for Trump to dial back his rhetorical attacks on the media and his critics.

•••

Trump initially calls for unity in the face of the attempted bombings but soon lashes out at the criticism. He then laments that the crisis has cooled Republicans’ momentum in the midterms, prompting critics to say he’s supporting a false-flag theory among right-wing extremists that Democrats schemed up the bomb deliveries to vilify the GOP.

•••

Authorities arrest a Florida man living in a van covered with Trump stickers in connection with the incidents.

•••

At a campaign rally, Trump praises Republican Rep. Greg Gianforte for body-slamming a reporter in 2017. “Any guy that can do a body slam — he’s my kind of guy.”

•••

Trump claims without evidence that Democrats are behind the Central American caravan. He suggests they’re encouraging the immigrants to cast illegal votes for them in the midterms.

•••

Despite growing evidence that members of Saudi Arabia’s royal family were involved in Khashoggi’s murder, Trump defends the Saudis. “Just spoke with the Crown Prince of Saudi Arabia who totally denied any knowledge of what took place in their Turkish Consulate,” he tweets.

•••

Asked later by the Associated Press about Saudi involvement, Trump says, “Here we go again with, ‘You’re guilty until proven innocent’.”

Week 92 (Oct. 21-27)

A white nationalist shoots and kills 11 people worshipping at the Tree of Life synagogue in a Pittsburgh suburb. Trump condemns the attacks. But when critics again say his rhetoric has helped give rise to hate crimes, Trump blames the media.

•••

Trump tells the crowd at a campaign rally in Houston, “You know what I am? I’m a nationalist.”

•••

Regarding the Tree of Life, Trump says: “Through the centuries, the Jews have endured terrible persecution. You know that. We have all read it. We have studied it.” Later, he adds, “If there was an armed guard inside the temple, they would have been able to stop him.”

•••

When Trump announces he’ll visit the synagogue, 11 local Jewish leaders react with a statement: “President Trump, you are not welcome in Pittsburgh until you fully denounce white nationalism.”

•••

Trump once again invites Putin to the White House.

•••

American history Trump-style, addendum: Trump tells a rally crowd he is second only to George Washington in terms of filling the Supreme Court. In fact, he’s tied with the last four presidents and is well behind Franklin Roosevelt (nine) and Ronald Reagan (four).

Week 93 (Oct. 28-Nov. 3)

Trump refers to the Central American migrant caravan, which consists overwhelming of families fleeing violence and poverty, as an “invasion,” prompting critics to accuse him of fear-mongering in hopes of driving Republicans to the polls.

Week 94 (Nov. 4-10)

Democrats ride a huge anti-Trump wave to the polls and win control of the House as well as gubernatorial races in Nevada, Kansas and other states where Trump had endorsed Republican candidates. Trump claims victory anyway.

•••

The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals upholds an injunction blocking Trump’s decision to phase out DACA.

•••

Trump is criticized for victim-blaming when he cites poor forest management as the cause of deadly wildfires raging in California and threatens to withhold federal assistance to the state if policies aren’t changed. Trump claims that simply raking the forests will fix things. California officials note most of the forest land is federal and that raking is not a solution.

•••

In another immigration crackdown, the administration issues an order making individuals ineligible for asylum if they cross the border anywhere but a legal point of entry.

•••

A broken relationship comes to an end when Sessions is forced out.

•••

Several media organizations, including Fox News, announce they will not air a new Trump campaign ad that incorrectly blames Democrats for allowing convicted murderer Luis Bracamontes into the country illegally.

•••

Playing down speculation that he appointed Matthew Whitaker as acting attorney general to squelch the Mueller investigation, Trump tells reporters, “I don’t know Matt Whitaker” and hasn’t spoken to him about the probe. However …

•••

… It’s quickly revealed that a month earlier, Trump had told Fox News: “I can tell you Matt Whitaker’s a great guy. I mean, I know Matt Whitaker.” Whitaker, it is learned, has met multiple times with the president.

•••

In a further sign of the damage caused by Trump’s tariffs, the Agriculture Department’s Economic Research Service estimates that net farm income in 2018 will be 13 percent lower than the previous year.

Week 95 (Nov. 11-17)

After clashing with first lady Melania Trump, White House deputy national security adviser Mira Ricardel is forced out of the administration.

•••

A U.S. District Court judge in California rules that the asylum order “irreconcilably conflicts” with immigration law and the “expressed intent of Congress.”Trump lashes out, saying the ruling came from an “Obama judge.” This prompts a rare rebuke from Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts Jr., who issues a statement defending the objectivity of the courts.

•••

Trump hits back, tweeting that Roberts is wrong and that “It would be great if the 9th Circuit was indeed an ‘independent judiciary.’ ” Point of fact: The judge who made the ruling, Jon Tigar, is a federal district judge and not a member of the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals.

•••

Trump tells reporters it is a “good time” for a shutdown unless lawmakers approve funding for the border wall.

•••

Asked about the Mueller probe on Fox News, Trump says “We’ve wasted enough time on this witch hunt.” At this point, the probe has resulted in convictions for three senior Trump associates and a total of 33 people being charged with crimes.

Week 96 (Nov. 18-24)

In response to a Thanksgiving Day question from reporters, Trump says he’s thankful for himself. “This country is so much stronger now than it was when I took office that you wouldn’t believe it,” he says.

•••

Despite reports that the CIA has concluded with “high confidence” that Mohammed bin Salman ordered Khashoggi’s killing, Trump issues a statement in which he continues to stand by the Saudis. The statement says “we may never know all of the facts” about the death and that the U.S. “intends to remain a steadfast partner of Saudi Arabia.” Critics point out this is another example of Trump siding with foreign nationals over U.S. intelligence and protecting wealthy people who do business with his properties.

•••

The Washington Post reports that Ivanka Trump used personal email extensively for official business — the same actions that Trump and Republicans vilified Hillary Clinton for doing as secretary of state. Trump defends his daughter, describing her emails as “very innocent” and saying they were nothing like Clinton’s.

•••

The White House announces that troops will be deployed to the U.S.-Mexico border in response to what Trump calls an “invasion” of migrants. Mattis, who has disagreed with Trump on a number of matters, does it again by clarifying that the troops wouldn’t have firearms.

Week 97 (Nov. 25-Dec. 1)

Cohen pleads guilty to lying to Congress about his dealings in Russia as Trump’s attorney during the 2016 campaign. He admits he and Trump enthusiastically pursued a “Trump Tower Moscow” project throughout the campaign. Prosecutors say Cohen admitted giving false details that suggested Trump had limited involvement and knowledge of the deal, when in fact members of the Trump family had been briefed about it numerous times.

•••

Trump calls Cohen a “weak person” and says “There would have been nothing wrong” if Trump had been involved in the Moscow deal.

•••

Mueller says Manafort has violated his plea deal by lying to investigators, raising the possibility that he is protecting others in the administration and angling for a presidential pardon. Trump says a pardon is not off the table.

•••

Newly disclosed emails between Trump political adviser Roger Stone and a former associate, Jerome Corsi, show that the two were aware in advance of WikiLeaks’ plan to release hacked emails from Clinton’s presidential campaign. The revelation raises speculation that Stone will become a new focal point in the Mueller investigation, as prosecutors allege that WikiLeaks obtained the emails from a hacker with ties to Russian military intelligence.

•••

General Motors announces it will close five manufacturing plants in the U.S. and Canada and eliminate 15 percent of its salaried workforce, partly to adapt to changing consumer demand but also as a result of Trump’s steel and aluminum tariffs. Trump slams the company and threatens to take action to damage GM.

•••

The trade war cools off a bit: After talks between Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping at the G20 summit, the U.S. and China declare a 90-day halt on imposition of any new tariffs.

•••

Trump tweets that steel companies are “opening and renovating plants all over the country” and that “auto companies are pouring into the U.S.” Both statements are lies. BMW only made a soft commitment to opening a plant, and overall auto investment is down. And there’s no widespread trend of building new steel plants.

•••

Trump cancels his White House meeting with Putin, citing Russia’s refusal to release Ukrainian Navy ships and sailors seized after a confrontation between the countries days earlier.

•••

Somebody else’s problem: Quoting sources close to Trump, Daily Beast reports that the president shrugged off warnings about a coming debt crisis fueled partly by the GOP tax cuts. By the time the crisis comes about, he tells them, he’ll be out of office and won’t have to shoulder the blame. “Yeah, but I won’t be here,” he’s reported to have said.

Week 98 (Dec. 2-8)

After Nikki Haley’s resignation in October as U.N. ambassador, Trump announces his pick for the position — former “Fox & Friends” host Heather Nauert. Nauert had no diplomatic or government experience when she came to the administration in 2017 as the State Department spokeswoman.

•••

Ending months of speculation, Trump says Kelly will leave the administration by the end of the year.

•••

The administration submits a sweeping proposed revision to the Clean Water Act that would strip federal oversight from an extensive collection of wetlands, streams, ponds and similar habitats. In addition, Trump lifts Obama-era limits on greenhouse gas emissions from coal power plants.

Week 99 (Dec. 9-15)

Smock ’em if you got ’em: Democratic Rep. Jerrold Nadler, the incoming chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, says he would consider it an impeachable offense if Trump’s hush-money payments were found to violate campaign finance laws. Trump tweets: “Democrats can’t find a Smocking Gun tying the Trump campaign to Russia after James Comey’s testimony. … So now the Dems go to a simple private transaction, wrongly call it a campaign contribution, which it was not (but even if it was, it is only a CIVIL CASE, like Obama’s – but it was done correctly by a lawyer and there would not even be a fine. Lawyer’s liability if he made a mistake, not me). Cohen just trying to get his sentence reduced. WITCH HUNT!”

•••

Cohen is sentenced to three years in federal prison. In an interview with ABC’s “Good Morning America,” he says Trump was concerned the women’s stories “would affect the election” and knew the payments were wrong. Trump tweets that he “never directed Michael Cohen to break the law.”

•••

Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke resigns amid a litany of investigations into reported ethics violations, lavish spending and conflicts of interest involving real estate dealings in the former congressman’s home state of Montana.

•••

A U.S. District Court judge in Texas rules that Obamacare is unconstitutional. “It’s a great ruling for our country. We will be able to get great health care,” Trump says. However, the administration has not advanced a comprehensive plan for American health care in the two years since taking office.

•••

Trump tells Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi that he will be “proud” to shut down the government if Congress doesn’t provide funding for the border wall.

•••

Trump tweets that the Justice Department should investigate “Saturday Night Live” for colluding with Democrats.

Week 100 (Dec. 16-22)

Taking a step long dreamed of by Putin, Trump unexpectedly announces that U.S. troops will be withdrawn from Syria, prompting across-the-aisle outcry. Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., says it would be an “Obama-like mistake.”

•••

The Syria announcement is the last straw for Mattis, who steps down. “Because you have a right to a Secretary of Defense whose views are better aligned with yours on these and other subjects, I believe it is right for me to step down from my position,” Mattis says in his resignation letter.

•••

With the shutdown deadline approaching on Dec. 21, the White House appears to drop its demand for border wall funding. But after taking criticism from far-right media commentators, Trump does a 180 and says he won’t sign a stopgap spending bill if it doesn’t include the funding. The deadline passes without a deal, and the shutdown begins.

•••

North Korea announces it will not give up its nuclear weapons as long as the U.S. is a nuclear threat.

•••

The administration scraps an Obama-era set of guidelines aimed at curbing disproportionate disciplining of students of color.

Week 101 (Dec. 23-29)

ProPublic offers a summary of its Documenting Hate project: “Since we launched the project in January 2017, victims and witnesses of hate incidents have sent us more than 5,400 reports from all 50 states. We’ve verified nearly 1,200 reports, either via independent reporting or through corroborating news coverage. “

•••

Answering the White House’s traditional Christmas Eve calls from children, Trump asks a 7-year-old named Collman: “Are you still a believer in Santa? Because at 7, it’s marginal, right?”

•••

The Dow Jones industrial average plunges to 21,857.73, its lowest finish since August 2017, during a rollercoaster month for the stock market. The month closes with the Dow at 23,153.94.

•••

Week 102 (Dec. 30-Jan. 5)

Trump signs a sweeping criminal justice reform bill — a rarity in that it has drawn bipartisan support.

Week 103 (Jan. 6-12)

The New York Times reports that in 2017, federal law enforcement officials began an investigation into whether Trump had worked on behalf of Russia against U.S. interests.

•••

Trump responds with a tweet storm in which he denies the story and makes his often-repeated claim that he’s been far tougher on Russia than Obama, George W. Bush or Bill Clinton.

•••

The Washington Post reports that Trump seized and withheld the notes from a 2017 meeting with Putin in Helsinki. Trump denies it.

Week 104 (Jan. 13-19)

The Washington Post reveals that since April, when T-Mobile announced a $26 billion merger with rival Sprint that needs the Trump administration’s sign-off, several top T-Mobile executives have stayed at the Trump International hotel near the White House on numerous occasions. The situation raises questions about whether T-Mobile execs and others are patronizing the hotel, where rooms average $300 a night, to curry favor with the administration.

•••

Whiplash alert! Giuliani tells CNN’s Chris Cuomo that he “never said there was no collusion” between the Trump campaign and Russia leading to the 2016 presidential election. Giuliani says instead that he never said there was collusion between Trump himself and the Russians. The statement contradict years of tweets and statements from Trump.

Epilogue

As Trump’s first two years draw to a close, Russia has made major advances on the world stage, the Western alliance is on its weakest footing in 70 years, North Korea continues to expand its nuclear capabilities, Trump’s trade war has thrown world trade into a crisis affecting U.S. businesses and consumers, clean air and water regulations have been removed, environmental protections have been relaxed at an unprecedented rate, the federal government has been shut down for the third time, 65 percent of Trump’s Cabinet has left, multiple Cabinet positions are occupied by “acting” leaders with limited experience in the role because so few people want to work with this president, the Mueller investigation is assumed to be nearing its conclusion, Trump and his family face multiple congressional investigations, economists worry that tariffs and general economic chaos are inviting a recession, and The Washington Post reports that Trump has made 7,645 false or misleading claims as of Dec. 30 while undermining Americans’ expectation that their president be truthful with them.

Trump’s motto continues to be “Make America Great Again.”

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